How to add SCSI drive to Ubuntu Server

While messing about in my home lab I found I needed to add a SCSI drive to a virtual machine and had no idea how to do it. Although this doesn’t have anything to do with security I’ve posted it here as I know I will definitely need to do this again at some point. Here we have already attached the new VHD to a SCSI connection in the Virtual machine management console, so the disk is physically connected but needs to be formatted, labelled, and initialised.

To list all connected disks run

ls /dev/sd*

this will return the following

If you are unsure which is the new disk, then the easiest way to check is to disconnect the new SCSI drive and run this command, then reconnect the disk and run the same command again and compare the results. The disk that wasn’t there the first time is obviously your new disk. The disks should be labelled “sd” then with a corresponding letter. The primary disk is usually “sda” with the partitions numbered – so sda1 would be the first partition on the first disk. In our example sdb is our new disk so we will be applying changes to this, if your disk is named differently then you will need top replace “sdb” with the name of your own disk in the following instructions.

Once we have identified the new disk we are ready to launch “fdisk” utility.

sudo fdisk /dev/sdb

Always look at the help menus when using new tools as it will help you gain an understanding of it rather than just blindly following instructions. Help menu is shown below

From here we type “n” for a new partition, then “p” for primary and accept all the defaults.

You must then select “w” to write¬†and save the changes, if you don’t do this then the partition will not be created.

Now that we’ve created our partition we need to create the file system

sudo mkfs.ext3 -L DATA /dev/sdb1

The “-L” switch sets the partition label, here we have used “DATA” but you can chose anything, and we are setting it on our new partition which is “/dev/sdb1”

Now we mount the filesystem

sudo mount /dev/sdb1/DATA

To check the location is mounted we can run

Df -l

Next we make a directory

sudo mkdir /Documents

The final thing we need to do is change a configuration so that this new location is mounted every time the server is restarted.

We do this by editing the following file.

sudo nano /etc/fstab

Then add the following line as shown below. (If you named your partition differently then use your label name instead

/dev/sdb1          /Data        auto       defaults    0  0

That’s it. Check this config by restarting your machine then running the list disk, and show mounted commands again and you should see that your new partition is already mounted as shown in the screen shots below.